Collection: The Garden Collection

Our floral print Garden Collection is full of beautiful, vibrant designs for wrapping gifts or carrying items on the go. The 8 furoshiki prints are inspired by Keiko's childhood garden and the flowers of Japan. Shop now for the perfect addition to your sustainable lifestyle.

japanese wrapping cloth furoshiki
keiko kira keiko furoshiki

The Inspiration

When working on our first collection, the memory of my mother’s garden came to my mind. It was always so exciting to see colorful flowers and buds on tree branches in early spring. In Japan, a new school year starts in April under the Japanese government fiscal system. When students begin a new academic year in April, we also see the iconic cherry blossoms. Since this is our very first collection, I wanted to create a collection that signified the beginning of our journey.

— Keiko Kira

  • Reusable Fabric Gift Wrap Furoshiki from Keiko Furoshiki

    Narcissus

    Inspired by the first flowers of spring, the resilient and elegant narcissus signals the end of winter. The vibrant yellow against the purple background is a high-contrast print that blends sweetness and sophistication.

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  • Reusable Fabric Gift Wrap Furoshiki from Keiko Furoshiki

    Tulip on Water

    This best-selling print is inspired by the white and blue motifs of French, Dutch, and Chinese ceramics, the shapes of Buddist prayer beads, and also references the serene water of Beppu Bay where Keiko grew up.

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  • Reusable Fabric Gift Wrap Furoshiki from Keiko Furoshiki

    White Camellia

    Flowering Camellia trees have long been associated with purity and beauty, as well as the coming of spring. This is arguably our most traditional print made modern with a blend of conventional and whimsical camellia shapes.

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  • Reusable Fabric Gift Wrap Furoshiki from Keiko Furoshiki

    Zinnia Flower

    Inspired by the zinnia bushes outside Keiko's childhood home, this happy, saturated print features bold summer flowers pointing towards a bright blue sky, all set against a kikko —or tortoise shell, pattern backdrop.

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  • Reusable Fabric Gift Wrap Furoshiki from Keiko Furoshiki

    Black Sunflower

    This vibrant print is an ode to the end-of-summer sunflower heavy with seeds. The high-contrast depiction of floral silhouettes against a chartreuse color makes this print a stand-out, somewhat rebellious piece.

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  • Reusable Fabric Gift Wrap Furoshiki from Keiko Furoshiki

    Red Flowers

    This painterly print depicts the whimsical image of a field of wild flowers facing the sun while also featuring Keiko's hand-drawn style in each floral shape, set on a backdrop of purple brushstrokes.

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  • Reusable Fabric Gift Wrap Furoshiki from Keiko Furoshiki

    White Tulip

    This seemingly random motif is a cheeky take on the elegant tulip, paired with hand-drawn gold rings and set on a backdrop featuring the Japanese embroidery technique of sashiko.

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  • Reusable Fabric Gift Wrap Furoshiki from Keiko Furoshiki

    Pastel Tulips

    This feminine and melancholic print captures the elegance of the passage of time as the spring tulip gets heavy and droops into a shapely form when cut and placed in a vase.

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  • red flower

    It's reusable

    The United States produces 4.6 million pounds of wrapping paper every year, and half of that—approximately 2.3 million pounds—winds up in landfills. If every American family wrapped just 3 presents in reused materials, it would save enough paper to cover 45,000 football fields.

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    It's functional

    Gift a Keiko Furoshiki on its own or wrap another present with one for a 2-in-1 surprise. Once unwrapped, a furoshiki can be used in a variety of every day ways: as table linens, a fashion accessory, or frame it and hang it on a wall. It's the gift that keeps on giving.

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    It's beautiful

    Our furoshiki are lovingly designed by Japanese-American artist Keiko Kira. The playful prints are inspired by her childhood growing up in Japan and invoke the seasonal colors in nature, of cultural celebrations, and the beauty and craftsmanship of everyday items.